Rural-urban comparison of mothers’ media access and information needs on dengue prevention and control

Aedes-aegypti

Note: This is my undergraduate thesis in Development Communication.  

Notable insights could be drawn from this study which may serve as a guide for campaign planners at the Department of Health on strategic information dissemination of dengue prevention and control measures.

Results of the study revealed that urban mothers had higher media access and exposure to information but surprisingly had low knowledge and practice levels of dengue prevention and control than rural mothers. It could be that mothers did not place importance and trust in these media sources as far a health issues are concerned. It is recommended that campaign strategies on dengue prevention and control focus more on the urban setting where their high media access and information exposure can be used to an advantage.

Further, there is a need to examine the content of information materials on dengue prevention and control to determine their readability and adequacy.However, both urban and rural settings exhibited low knowledge and just half of them had high practice levels. To address this, communication specialists can plan more efficient information dissemination building on the positive attitude of respondents towards dengue prevention and control.Overall, there is a highly significant relationship between media access and knowledge of respondents. This implies that the more access to media the respondents had, the more they could acquire knowledge.

Thus, a campaign on dengue prevention and control can enhance its success with the use of broadcast and interpersonal channels for information dissemination.Another notable insight is that age and educational attainment have a significant relationship to the respondents’ attitude and knowledge, respectively. This implies that socio-demographic characteristics such as age and educational attainment need to be considered when planning a communication campaign for dengue in the future.

Based on the FGDs, respondents said that there is a higher need for information on dengue prevention and control that must be disseminated effectively and that it is not only the role of the people to prevent dengue, but also a joint effort with the government. FGD participants from barangays Seguinon and Linao pushed for the government undertaking an efficient waste disposal site so as address their problem of garbage disposal and sanitation – one of the contributing factors to the occurrence of dengue.

The global burden of dengue has grown dramatically in recent decades, and it is currently classified as an emerging or re-emerging infectious disease. Dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) occur in over 100 countries, with more than 2.5 billion people at risk and an estimated 50 million infections per year. The disease is endemic in all WHO Regions except the European Region (EUR). The major disease burden is found in south-east Asia and the western Pacific, with increased reporting of DF/DHF in the Americas (WHO/TDR, 2002).

This study focused on rural and urban comparison of mothers’ media access and information needs on dengue prevention and control : (1) Determine respondents’ socio-demographic characteristics; (2) find out respondents’ media access and their exposure to information on dengue; (3) determine their knowledge, attitude, and practice of dengue prevention and control measures; (4) find out the relationship between respondents’ socio-demographic characteristics and their knowledge, attitude and practice of dengue prevention and control,  and (5) compare respondents’ media access, exposure to information, and their knowledge, attitude and practice of their dengue prevention and control measures. 

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Rural-Urban Comparison on Mothers’ Media Access and Information Needs on Dengue Prevention and Control by Buen Josef Cainila Andrade

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